Things Thursday #020: What makes a city smart?, Microsoft entering the thermostat battle, and some great resources on smart homes for you

A hand holding our environmental quality sensor, which is called the Touchstone. It's about the size and shape of a bar of soap.

The Touchstone sensor from CRT Labs. This device will read temperature, humidity, light, CO2, VOCs, particulate matter and more.

  1. What are 10 key things that make a city smart? (via ReadWrite)
    This is a great roundup of what a city needs to be smart. From connectivity to sensing, ReadWrite put together a great roundup. If you’re interested in the real estate perspective on smart cities, we’ve got a series for you to check out called ‘The Building of Functioning Cities‘.
  2. And finally: Amazon Echo 2 incoming and more (via Wareable)
    Yes, this is a list of smart home/wearable items for you to peruse. They have some good intel on Amazon’s latest smart speaker as well as what Apple’s up to on the smart home front. Check it out.
  3. What to know about smart home technology: 10 smart home resources for REALTORS (via CRT Labs)
    Another roundup??? What’s going on with this list? 🙂 I would be remiss if I didn’t point you to our roundup of resources you can take advantage of to bolster your understanding of this emerging market. Why does it matter to you? Because it matters to your clients. Read on to find out more.
  4. Microsoft’s Cortana-powered thermostat is totally gorgeous (via CNET)
    This is definitely something to consider. A nice-looking thermostat from Microsoft and Johnson Controls. No pricing info yet, but keep an eye on this. It’s called the GLAS, it’s voice-enabled (with Cortana, Microsoft’s answer to Siri and Alexa) and it monitors indoor and outdoor air quality. If you want a voice-enabled thermostat now, check out the Ecobee4 with Alexa integration. If the $249 price point is keeping you away, you should look for rebates from your utility or insurance company.
  5. Touchstone: Environmental Quality Monitor for your home! (via CRT Labs)
    Finally, a look at what we’ve been up to. This device is not on the market yet, but take a look at our work. Really proud of our group here at NAR. Akram, one of our lab engineers, provides a pretty deep dive into what we’ve been up to with this device. I’m really proud of our team and their efforts to make this piece of hardware and the software behind it. They’ve been extremely supportive of one another and have collaborated better than I could have imagined. Kudos to them.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

Touchstone: Environmental Quality Monitor for Your Home!

The Touchstone is an open hardware and software indoor environmental quality sensor designed by the National Association of REALTORS/CRT Labs. The idea behind the Touchstone was conceived in the summer of 2016, when we at CRT Labs were exploring various types of personal air quality monitors available in the market. We found that most of them were around $150-$200 for one device, costing a lot more in some cases. They used cheap sensors that weren’t accurate, and almost all had a dependency on a combination of a smartphone app and some cloud platform on the internet that it pushes data to. If we want to monitor the environmental quality of the entire home, we would have to spend around $200 for each room and give up privacy for the sake of cloud access to our data.

The Rosetta Home 2.0 platform developed by CRT Labs aims to solve exactly this issue. We developed it with an offline first mentality – no internet required. Cloud connectivity is optional for data backup, large-scale research and more in-depth data analysis. You are not locked into any one cloud provider or a mobile platform. With the addition of the Touchstone, a home’s environmental quality can now be monitored locally, accurately, and at a relatively affordable price.

A Touchstone can measure the local temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, TVOC (total volatile organic compound) concentration, PM2.5 (particulate matter) mass concentration, sound intensity, light intensity and barometric pressure. With advancement in MEMS and CMOS technology, we now have access to sensors that are extremely cheap and have decent accuracy, and more are being available every day. In order to find the right balance between price and performance, several sensors are tested along with higher-end reference sensors that we know are accurate from literature review of other studies. Sample CO2 data from one of our sensor tests is shown in the graph below:

From the graph, we can see that the sensors can vary widely in the readings. Similar tests are being done for other parameters that we measure. We found that some of the sensors that report incorrect values are currently being used in popular air quality monitors in the market today. Our goal is to maintain relatively high accuracy in sensor readings. This allows our Touchstone devices to be used in large-scale research projects that can provide large data-sets of anonymous environmental quality for different types of climate zones and different types of homes across the country. Ultimately, the goal is to yield useful correlations between this hyper-local data and energy use and human activity.

The Touchstone devices wirelessly send data to a receiver that’s also on the same network. For wireless transmission, an FSK radio transceiver running at 915MHz frequency is used. This frequency band is license-free and set as an ISM band for commercial and industrial products. Using a dedicated transceiver as opposed to relying on commonly used protocols that operate in the 2.4GHz bands such as WiFi, ZigBee, Bluetooth and others allows for robust, low-power and long-range wireless operation. The radio modules have a transmission range of over 500 m in open air and over 150-200 m in occupied buildings. Due to their operation in the sub-GHz frequency bands, they have much better obstacle penetration, greater reception and stronger immunity to the ever increasing RF noise in the spectrum. This contributes to superior performance for the specified application of data logging within buildings. Using dedicated radios also eliminates dependencies on internet access (wired or wireless) on every sensor location as well as electric power in some cases where the sensor can run on batteries for several years at a stretch. Currently, the Touchstone runs on a 5V USB power supply, the same one we use for charging our cell phones. There are application-specific versions currently in development that allow for lower power versions of these boards. The Touchstone and other boards in its family can all be made relatively cheaper than their commercial counterparts.

The gateway receiver has the same radio module which constantly monitors all incoming wireless sensor data from around the building and pushes it over USB to the Rosetta Home platform running on a Raspberry Pi. The data can then be aggregated and monitored in real-time locally, and also pushed to the cloud for remote-monitoring and research purposes if necessary.

Currently, we are designing and testing various types of enclosures at a manufacturing facility called mHUB here in Chicago. Here’s a Touchstone prototype in its enclosure and its relative size in the average hand:

This is how the assembled boards looks like without the enclosure:

The assembly of the board is currently done manually at CRT Labs, as we are iterating over the hardware design and as sensor tests yield more data. Over the next few months, the assembly of the boards will be done at mHUB, which has factory-grade equipment using which the production can scale to several hundred units per day. These devices when complete will be used for research studies to be conducted by CRT Labs in Chicago, and later, in various cities around the country in the coming months. The data that comes from this research can give us an insight on how residential and commercial buildings perform across seasons, and how they impact energy usage. Ultimately, this will lead to more energy-efficient, smart and healthier buildings in the near future.

What to Know About Smart Home Technology: 10 Resources for REALTORS & Their Clients

Smart home technology is definitely here to stay. According to a recent report on consumer adoption of smart home technology, 79% said they own some type of smart home tech. Those that owned it said they would purchase more. Ninety-seven percent of consumers now know what smart devices are. This is up from 67% in 2015. Because of market awareness, there are several opportunities for you to discuss these devices with your clients. They may:

  • have interest in adding value to a home before selling it
  • be wondering if they should leave devices with the home
  • want to outfit their new home with devices
  • be curious about simply learning more

As more and more of these devices hit the market, consumers will ask you about the benefits and their needs. Below, we’ve compiled a list of resources for you to use to educate yourself and your clients on smart home technology.

Here are 10 resources that you can use in improving your understanding of smart home technology:

1. Smart Home Glossary and Smart Home/Internet of Things FAQ

The glossary and FAQ are good places to start. They give you all the terms that relate to smart home devices. From how these devices connect to what IoT is. It’s a compendium of the most asked questions we’ve received with respect to these devices. Help clients get ahead of the curve by sharing the links with them.

2. The Insecurity of Things: Understanding Security Issues Around the Internet of Things

Last fall, when the denial of service attack happened and most of the internet wouldn’t work, I wrote a 3-part series on the security issues around the internet of things. I looked at what you as a user of these devices can do to protect yourself as well as what manufacturers need to do to protect you. Security is paramount for these devices and this series gives some insights on what to do to make sure you understand the risks and how to mitigate them.

3. Smart Home Simplified 1-Pagers

Our Smart Home Simplified series of 1-pagers is meant to give you a high level overview of the different device classes in the smart home space. These 1-pagers are great tools for educating yourself, other agents, or consumers. You are able to share them with whomever you’d like. Add a link in your newsletter or other informational posts. Each sheet talks about the pros and cons of these devices, how they work and why consumers are interested in them. The 10 classes of devices we cover are:

  • Thermostats
  • Locks
  • Doorbells
  • Cameras
  • Indoor Air Quality Sensors
  • Lights
  • Hubs
  • Voice Activated Speakers
  • Water Leak Detectors
  • Smoke/CO Detectors

Each page will also provide you with a link to a resources page for that class of devices. Think we need to add another class of devices? Let us know.

4. CRT’s Smart Home Report

Last year, we did our first smart home report with our Research Group at NAR. This will be an ongoing annual report for the next few years. We are working to better understand your knowledge of the space and that of the consumer market. Use it to understand what devices are important to consumers and where there are opportunities to help support clients in their quest to understand this market.

5. Educate Yourself & Consumers on Incentives from Utilities & Insurance Companies

I recently wrote a piece on the value of understanding what rebates and incentives are being offered by your utilities and insurance companies. These incentives may or may not be known by your clients, but knowing about what is available in your area is of tremendous value to them. It also shows that you’re looking out for ways to improve their experience.

6. CRT Labs’ Things Thursday

On a semi-regular basis, we put together a round-up on the internet of things and talk about the implications for real estate. We look at the way in the future tech as well as stuff that you can take advantage of today. It’s a great list of links you can share with your team, other agents or clients.

7. CRT Labs’ Office Hours Every Friday

Our Facebook page is a great place to find resources. Every Friday, we hold Office Hours on emerging technology. They start at 3p Eastern and run for about 20 minutes. We love receiving questions and comments during the Office Hours so we can discuss with you and have active conversation on these topics. Like the page and be notified immediately of any live videos we are doing.

8. Smart Home Checklist App

Have you sold a home that had smart home devices in it already? If so, did you have those devices reset by the seller before transferring ownership? If not, the seller may still have access to the smart devices. To help with this problem, we created a web app called the Smart Home Checklist. This simple app will allow you to identify the devices in the home, aggregate them on a list and share that list with whomever you want.

9. Smart Home DB

The Smart Home DB is a great resource to find out more about specific devices. They have nearly 1,200 devices listed in this community-curated database. They also have user-generated plans for hooking up different devices and some how-tos. We are actually feeding the backend of our Smart Home Checklist from this repository.

10. IoT Podcast from Stacey Higginbotham

Stacey is an IoT industry expert and she has a great podcast on the topic of smart homes, smart cities and industrial IoT. She has vendors and industry experts talk about the market now and what’s coming.She’s even covered CRT’s work in the past on her podcast. Stacey’s expertise comes from years of covering technology for a number of news sites, including Fortune and GigaOm. Sign up for her newsletter and find out what’s coming next.

BONUS: This blog & CRT Labs

You might have noticed a lot of the resources I posted linked back to this blog. There’s a reason for that. CRT is one of the few resources thinking about the impact of emerging technology on your business. We talk to members about it, as well as speaking to industry experts, vendors, security groups, universities, government and research laboratories about you and your business. They see you as a valuable resource and are very interested in your feedback and work. So, use us as a resource. We do webinars, presentations and all sorts of educational outreach. Drop us a line if you’d like us to present to your group.

That’s it for this roundup. Are there any resources you’d like from us that aren’t listed above? Follow us on Twitter and Facebook and let us know.

 

The Building of Functioning Cities: Navigating the Smart City

Time-lapse photo of cars driving in Atlanta, GA at night. Shoes trailing tail lights and headlights with Atlanta in the background.

Photo by Joey Kyber on Unsplash

As cities become more densely populated, getting around them takes on a new sense of urgency. One of the big reasons cities are interested in smart city technology is to help solve transportation problems. In this article, we’ll look at three technologies that help residents navigate their cities and identify what the value is to them and to the real estate practitioner.

Smart street lights help the city save money, energy and reduce light pollution

Cities like Chicago, LA, Barcelona, and Amsterdam are employing new lighting strategies to cut down on light pollution, reduce energy usage, and better serve their citizens. One company working on this problem, Tvilight, has developed a solution that will brighten when there are people around at night and dim when there aren’t. Tvilight has several deployments in large and small communities throughout Europe. Their lighting allows for city administrators to remotely set levels for lights, understand evening traffic patterns, and save energy. In some cases, these lights have helped reduce maintenance costs by up to 60% as well. For the real estate practitioner, communities using these lights could become a selling point. Reduced light pollution, yet retaining a safely lit environment is something that anyone would love.

Intelligent stop lights can help clear congestion and reduce accidents

In Sioux Falls, South Dakota, adaptive signal control technology is helping improve traffic flows and reduce accidents in the city. The smart stop lights have dropped traffic congestion by 5-11%. This means fewer idling cars, saving fuel and money for drivers. Another benefit is the technology has reduced the number of accidents. Because the technology can adapt, it means less of drivers trying to outrun a light change. Sioux Falls has seen a reduction in accidents from 1 accident every three days average to 1 accident every four days average. Over time, that adds up due to all the emergency services required during these times. This data can also help inform commute times and give you a real time sense of congestion, or if there are any accidents in the area, so you can adapt your route wherever you’re going.

 

Smart parking systems can let you know if there’s a space available anywhere

One of the biggest challenges to living in a large metropolitan area is finding parking. I live in a neighborhood that used to have plentiful street parking, but now, we can drive around for 15-30 minutes trying to find a space. Libelium is a company helping cities connect with citizens by providing real time parking space data. Using magnets, sensors and cameras, Libelium relays real time information about parking spaces in a community and can reduce the amount of time you are spending looking for a space. They could also provide historical information that can help city planners think about the parking issues in their city. This data will be extremely valuable in real estate for some time to come.

As you can see from the article, cities large and small are employing these techniques. Smart city technology is not an all or nothing proposition. You don’t need to have a myriad of smart solutions added right away. Communities are employing solutions to help them solve immediate problems, then adding to those solutions. Are you seeing solutions like these in your communities? Let us know in the comments below.

Facebook Live Office Hours: Google Home Giveaway!

We’re running a contest over on our Facebook page – if you comment on our recent office hours, you’ll be automatically entered to win a Google Home! To find out more, watch the video, and then head on over to the Facebook post. As always, liking our Facebook page will notify you when we go live on Fridays at 3PM Eastern. If you comment before our next office hours (which will be 7/14/17), you’ll still be eligible for the Google Home. We’ll draw the winner live on 7/14! See you then!

Facebook Live Office Hours: Google Home Giveaway! from CRTLabs on Vimeo.