wireframing

Welcome to Five for Wednesday, our weekly roundup of interesting tech news. Today, the (accidental) theme is rethinking interaction.

  1. Amazon released new abilities for smart doorbells and cameras. Among the new features are motion sensing linked to routines – so, for example, if someone is approaching your house and your smart camera detects it, the lights could turn on. Developers can also use the new API to enable two-way conversation between a smart doorbell and an Echo device.
  2. Columbus, Ohio, adds to its smart city repertoire by adopting driverless shuttles. The shuttles are currently in a trial run, and should be accepting passengers by December. The shuttle route includes Center of Science and Industry, Smart Columbus Experience Center, Bicentennial Park and National Veterans Memorial and Museum.
  3. Toyota wants autonomous cars that know how you feel. The company’s CEO says they want people having more fun in their cars, and suggests autonomous vehicles should appeal to people’s emotions and interests. This can including suggesting stop offs at national parks for nature lovers, and other AI guided experiences while traveling by car.
  4. Sidewalk Labs (a division of Google), is working with the city of Toronto on several projects, and recently released a statement about urban data. Since the public is who contributes the data, they’ve decided that a public trust – not a private company – should own that data, and it should be accessible to all. This is a huge step on making sure private interests don’t benefit from the public’s data without informed consent.
  5. The Palm Phone is a new way to think about smart phone experiences. Instead of going bigger, what if your phone was smaller? I’m not sure I buy into what Palm is selling – firstly, in order to even use a Palm, you need to already have a smart phone (so its not replacing anything), but the conscious decision to try to minimize your screen time/use a phone more intuitively is definitely something I can get behind.

Bonus (I can’t seem to narrow down to 5 these days): If you’re interested in learning more about how design works, and hearing about use cases of human-centered design, check out the new podcast “Wireframe.” It takes a “This American Life” style approach to talking about design, and the first two episodes are out now. The first discusses the Three Mile Island disaster in terms of “bad” user interface design, and the second takes a look at the city of Boston’s efforts to create a 311 app.