Coming Soon: A Pocket Guide to Air Purifying Plants

Over the past few months, CRT Labs, along with NAR’s Library and Information Technology staff, have been researching and developing a series of books about indoor air quality and plants you can grow in order to keep your air fresh and clean. The first in this Pocket Guide series is a book specifically aimed for commercial practitioners, and will educate REALTORS® about the best plants to advise their clients to buy for improving the indoor air quality of different office spaces. Further guides will dive into different residential air quality concerns.

NASA Plant Study

In the late 70s and early 80s, NASA began evaluating a variety of plants on their space stations to help clean the air onboard of not only carbon dioxide, but also from gases called volatile organic compounds. These gases, when contained and allowed to circulate in an indoor space, can lead the building’s occupants to contract a variety of illnesses. NASA identified 31 plants in their Clean Air Study as some of the best filters for these contaminants. We single out 10 of these plants due to their high ratings in the Clean Air Study as well as their availability at home and garden centers to focus on in our Pocket Guide. The book examines the best plants that work together to mitigate common indoor air quality issues in commercial spaces, teaches how to take care of these new plants, and includes rich color photographs of each plant discussed. Look for the book coming out in late spring or early summer this year, but until then, enjoy this excerpt from the book! These two paragraphs are from chapter two, titled “Thinking About the Air You Breathe.”

The average person spends around 90% of their time indoors, and the EPA estimates that indoor air quality can be two to five times more polluted than the air outdoors. This rise in indoor pollution is partially due to the fact that office design has shifted towards materials that release volatile organic compounds into the air. Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are found in almost all the materials in your buildings, especially in new construction – including the furniture, carpets, paints, cleaning products, and more. Buildings, which are more energy efficient than ever before, have tighter seals and are better constructed, which traps any pollution created indoors, or brought from the outdoors, in the building itself. These factors contribute to these higher levels of VOCs, as well as CO2, in the indoor air. Even while indoor air filtration systems are in use, VOCs can remain and continue to off-gas into the indoor environment.
VOCs, CO2, and other indoor environmental factors all contribute to sick building syndrome, which the National Institutes of Health define as “various nonspecific symptoms that occur in the occupants of a building… [which] increases sickness absenteeism and causes a decrease in productivity of the workers”. The symptoms of sick building syndrome include headache, dizziness, nausea, eye/nose/throat irritations, dry cough, dry/itching skin, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, sensitivity to odors, hoarseness of voice, allergies, cold/flu-like symptoms, asthma, and personality changes. Looking at this list, there’s an overlap in symptoms that are commonly associated with high levels of CO2 and VOCs in the air, meaning that sick building syndrome is likely brought on by these very gases.
The NASA Clean Air Study can be read in full at NASA’s website.

#014-Things Thursday: Bad bear, wifi parking, and more

An overhead shot of intersecting streets in a dense urban environment at night.

Strides are being made in urban connectivity, but toys are causing IoT nightmares. Do we need internet enabled teddy bears? Also, a major manufacturer is entering the air quality market.

  1. Acer is making an air quality monitor (via Engadget)
    Acer is known for laptops but now seem to be entering the smart home market with an air quality sensor. The device isn’t out yet, but will hit the market this summer. They’ll be looking for carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter (pm2.5 – fine dust and pm10 – pollen), temperature and humidity. Sounds intriguing. No word on pricing.
  2. Smart Road to Parked Car: Talk to Me (via IEEE Spectrum)
    As we add more smart cars and smart city infrastructure, how do we make sure the network connected devices stay connected? Well, there’s a group at Carnagie Mellon looking at how to do this using parked cars. Check it out.
  3. Light up your house for less with our illuminating guide to LED bulbs (via DigitalTrends)
    A really nice explainer on LEDs and how to compare watts and lumens as well as many other factors that go into choosing. Also, do you need smart bulbs? Find out in this great piece.
  4. Electronic teddy bears the latest target for hackers (via ReadWrite)
    Another year, another internet enabled toy hacked. Come on guys. Seriously. To quote the article, ‘Just because you can connect something, doesn’t mean you should.’ Either beef up your security or don’t connect it.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook.

#013-Things Thursday – Ring-a-ding-ding, smart city progress & more

A graph showing the air quality for Louisville Kentucky. Anything that is 51 or above is moderate air quality. Anything 50 and below is good air quality. In Louisville, from 02/06/17 to 02/16/17, the air quality was reported as mostly good.

Using smart city data that is available through open services, I was able to create this graph on Louisville air quality. Anything 50 and below is good air quality and anything above that is moderate air quality.

It looks like Amazon and Google are looking to use their voice hubs as a way to make calls. Also, smart cities need best practices just like smart homes. What about the niche of smart home security becoming a fertile ground for startups?

  1. How the Internet of Things inspired a new startup niche (via Entrepreneur)
    With a diverse array of devices from a large set of manufacturers, security of the connected home could be compromised. Enter devices and services to help secure your devices. Entrepreneur puts together a round up of companies who are trying to help make the smart home more secure.
  2. Amazon Echo and Google Home want to be your new house phone (via Engadget)
    As Amazon tries to even the playing field in the communications services with its release of Chime, their version of Google Hangouts, Engadget ponders what it would mean for the Amazon Echo or Google Home to become a communications hub. There are a lot of hurdles to clear before this happens, but being able to quickly communicate through these devices is something I look forward to.
  3. Smart cities get connectivity guidance from Connected City Blueprint (via readwrite)
    A smart city will become a data-rich platform for a REALTORS’ business. Micro-climate data, traffic flow, pedestrian flow and air quality will all become data points in the listings of the future. So, what smart cities are missing right now are a blueprint, or best practices, for deployment. Enter the Connected City Blueprint. It allows for cities to collaborate and share their experiences, helping those who are starting on the smart city path see what hurdles others have encountered.
  4. How’s the air up there? In Louisville, you can just ask your lightbulbs (via C|NET)
    For cities moving into the smart city arena, Louisville may be a great example of how to do it. They recently partnered with IFTTT to provide smart city data through their services. So, you can make your Philips Hue bulb change color to indicate air quality. Or, you can graph air quality of Louisville (see image above). It’s pretty cool. I created an applet to capture air quality data when it changes and put it in a Google Sheet. It took me about 3 minutes to set this up. Once more cities do things like this, we may have an amazing repository to pull from and create some cool mashups of real estate data and smart city data.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook.

CES 2017 Round Up – Part 2: Products We Are Excited To Follow

Following up on last week’s CES 2017 Trends Roundup, we wanted to share five products that we saw that we are really excited to watch in 2017!

personal safety realtors occlyOccly Occly is a wearable personal safety device specifically designed to be a visual deterrent. It can be worn on the body or clipped to an accessory. Occly is armed with a panic button, four cameras that provide nearly 360 degrees of coverage, sirens, a microphone, LED lighting, wireless capabilities, and a number of automatic alarm sensors.
Shield The NVIDIA Shield is a media streaming device, similar to an Apple TV or Chromecast that allows gaming, apps, and home control in one. It also touts support for Google Home.
Flow Plume LabsFlow FLOW is a smart, connected mobile accessory to track, monitor and reduce your exposure to air pollution – indoors, outdoors and on the go.
spec sensor air quality monitorSparrow Sense SPARROW is a wearable environmental health and safety monitor that measures Carbon Monoxide (CO), along with temperature, pressure and relative humidity. It can be attached to your smartphone case, clothes, bag, purse, stroller, bike, and even placed in your car.
Solpad Solpad’s have redesigned the solar panel, integrating batteries into the panel itself, and added software and hardware to integrate it with smart homes and a mobile app. Integrating the batteries into the panels could potentially cut installation costs in half.