Things Thursday #020: What makes a city smart?, Microsoft entering the thermostat battle, and some great resources on smart homes for you

A hand holding our environmental quality sensor, which is called the Touchstone. It's about the size and shape of a bar of soap.

The Touchstone sensor from CRT Labs. This device will read temperature, humidity, light, CO2, VOCs, particulate matter and more.

  1. What are 10 key things that make a city smart? (via ReadWrite)
    This is a great roundup of what a city needs to be smart. From connectivity to sensing, ReadWrite put together a great roundup. If you’re interested in the real estate perspective on smart cities, we’ve got a series for you to check out called ‘The Building of Functioning Cities‘.
  2. And finally: Amazon Echo 2 incoming and more (via Wareable)
    Yes, this is a list of smart home/wearable items for you to peruse. They have some good intel on Amazon’s latest smart speaker as well as what Apple’s up to on the smart home front. Check it out.
  3. What to know about smart home technology: 10 smart home resources for REALTORS (via CRT Labs)
    Another roundup??? What’s going on with this list? 🙂 I would be remiss if I didn’t point you to our roundup of resources you can take advantage of to bolster your understanding of this emerging market. Why does it matter to you? Because it matters to your clients. Read on to find out more.
  4. Microsoft’s Cortana-powered thermostat is totally gorgeous (via CNET)
    This is definitely something to consider. A nice-looking thermostat from Microsoft and Johnson Controls. No pricing info yet, but keep an eye on this. It’s called the GLAS, it’s voice-enabled (with Cortana, Microsoft’s answer to Siri and Alexa) and it monitors indoor and outdoor air quality. If you want a voice-enabled thermostat now, check out the Ecobee4 with Alexa integration. If the $249 price point is keeping you away, you should look for rebates from your utility or insurance company.
  5. Touchstone: Environmental Quality Monitor for your home! (via CRT Labs)
    Finally, a look at what we’ve been up to. This device is not on the market yet, but take a look at our work. Really proud of our group here at NAR. Akram, one of our lab engineers, provides a pretty deep dive into what we’ve been up to with this device. I’m really proud of our team and their efforts to make this piece of hardware and the software behind it. They’ve been extremely supportive of one another and have collaborated better than I could have imagined. Kudos to them.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

The Building of Functioning Cities: Navigating the Smart City

Time-lapse photo of cars driving in Atlanta, GA at night. Shoes trailing tail lights and headlights with Atlanta in the background.

Photo by Joey Kyber on Unsplash

As cities become more densely populated, getting around them takes on a new sense of urgency. One of the big reasons cities are interested in smart city technology is to help solve transportation problems. In this article, we’ll look at three technologies that help residents navigate their cities and identify what the value is to them and to the real estate practitioner.

Smart street lights help the city save money, energy and reduce light pollution

Cities like Chicago, LA, Barcelona, and Amsterdam are employing new lighting strategies to cut down on light pollution, reduce energy usage, and better serve their citizens. One company working on this problem, Tvilight, has developed a solution that will brighten when there are people around at night and dim when there aren’t. Tvilight has several deployments in large and small communities throughout Europe. Their lighting allows for city administrators to remotely set levels for lights, understand evening traffic patterns, and save energy. In some cases, these lights have helped reduce maintenance costs by up to 60% as well. For the real estate practitioner, communities using these lights could become a selling point. Reduced light pollution, yet retaining a safely lit environment is something that anyone would love.

Intelligent stop lights can help clear congestion and reduce accidents

In Sioux Falls, South Dakota, adaptive signal control technology is helping improve traffic flows and reduce accidents in the city. The smart stop lights have dropped traffic congestion by 5-11%. This means fewer idling cars, saving fuel and money for drivers. Another benefit is the technology has reduced the number of accidents. Because the technology can adapt, it means less of drivers trying to outrun a light change. Sioux Falls has seen a reduction in accidents from 1 accident every three days average to 1 accident every four days average. Over time, that adds up due to all the emergency services required during these times. This data can also help inform commute times and give you a real time sense of congestion, or if there are any accidents in the area, so you can adapt your route wherever you’re going.

 

Smart parking systems can let you know if there’s a space available anywhere

One of the biggest challenges to living in a large metropolitan area is finding parking. I live in a neighborhood that used to have plentiful street parking, but now, we can drive around for 15-30 minutes trying to find a space. Libelium is a company helping cities connect with citizens by providing real time parking space data. Using magnets, sensors and cameras, Libelium relays real time information about parking spaces in a community and can reduce the amount of time you are spending looking for a space. They could also provide historical information that can help city planners think about the parking issues in their city. This data will be extremely valuable in real estate for some time to come.

As you can see from the article, cities large and small are employing these techniques. Smart city technology is not an all or nothing proposition. You don’t need to have a myriad of smart solutions added right away. Communities are employing solutions to help them solve immediate problems, then adding to those solutions. Are you seeing solutions like these in your communities? Let us know in the comments below.

Things Thursday #018: Detroit, Smart City! and how secure are your speakers and more

A picture of the Detroit skyline.

Detroit’s getting sensors provided by citizens. Read below about Sensors in a Shoebox.

  1. HomePod, Echo, Google Home: How secure are your speakers? (via C|NET)
    There are a lot of questions around security and smart devices like the speakers. In fact, the audience at my presentation at the South Bay Association of REALTORS this past Monday were very concerned around security of smart speakers. This nice quick piece on the security of your data from Apple, Google and Amazon’s voice automation speakers. It seems like Apple has the advantage based on their encryption best practices. Even though they cost around $349, the HomePods secure your data the same way that Apple’s Messages and Siri applications do. Check it out and see if your security questions are answered.
  2. Toyota is exploring heart rate monitoring cars to help prevent accidents (via Wareable)
    For me, these types of thoughts around smart technologies are very worthwhile. Nothing is imminent from Toyota, but they are exploring how to determine if a driver is incapacitated and what they can do to help them in case of emergency.
  3. Samsung challenges Google with Connect Home Wi-Fi mesh (via ReadWrite)
    Mesh networking is becoming a big market and it’s being driven by IoT. Samsung joins Google, eero and several other companies in trying to scratch this itch. Follow the link to see what they are up to.
  4. Detroit Imagines a Citizen-Led Smart City (via CityLab)
    This is the type of thing I love about smart city work. A community coming together to solve a problem. Detroit is a great innovation space due to its past economic downturn. The city is ripe for change and new ideas. Working with the University of Michigan, residents are deploying smart sensors. The project, called Sensors in a Shoebox, are providing a low-cost way for residents to understand their environment. Imagine if REALTORs could help deploy projects like this to improve quality of life. Pretty cool.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

#016-Things Thursday: Cleaning the air without planting trees and more

An image of a product called CityTree, which has a park bench on each side and a 15ft wall of plants attached to both benches.

CityTree by GreenCity Solutions is an IoT device that monitors and cleans the air with plants.

In this week’s Things Thursday, we have a lot for the future, but also a lot focused on health. What if some devices

  1. Disney Research’s technology could transform IoT landscape (via Android Authority)
    Disney Research is one of the premier IoT/emerging technology labs in the world. They’ve got offices in Switzerland, Pittsburgh (in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University) and, of course, California. You might be surprised that Disney is doing scientific research, but when you think about the theme park business, it makes sense. Disneyworld and Disneyland are like miniature cities. So, from the lab comes another cool project from them. They’ve figured out how to reduce the power and improve the connectivity of IoT devices without an antenna. This is important for sensors that may have little to no external power options. They’ve also done research on powering devices without traditional power sources. Keep an eye on them.
  2. Microsoft Research’s ‘Emma Watch’ helped a Parkinson’s patient write again (via Wareable)
    Pretty amazing work from Microsoft Research. Parkinson’s wreaks havoc on your central nervous system and can make everyday activities a challenge. A researcher at Microsoft is building a device to reduce tremors for people living with Parkinson’s. In order to help people write or draw, the watch has tiny motors that vibrate on the patient’s arm, disrupting the feedback loop of the central nervous system. It’s pretty amazing. Click through and watch the video.
  3. Connected trees will be scrubbing the air in a city near you soon (via ReadWrite)
    Smart cities will not just be connected and gathering data, but they will help cities perform better. GreenCity Solutions are building these amazing benches that have plants and sensors embedded in them. They claim that their benches can filter the same amount of air as 275 planted trees. This means less watering needed, but the benefit of filtration from the plants is pretty great. Currently, CityTree is only in the European market and they have plans to expand to the US in late 2018. Even still, it’s a great example of how to green a space and provide some seating options. To find out more about why smart cities matter to REALTORS, check out my post on Building Functioning Cities.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

The Building of Functioning Cities: A Smart Cities Series

There is a blurry cityscape in the background with the phrase 'The Building of Functioning Cities' overlaid. This is a line from preamble of the REALTOR Code of Ethics. We believe this statement reflects the potential impact of smart cities on our industry.

Smart cities will impact the way we live and work in the very near future. Real estate stands to benefit from the data produced in these cities with improved services for clients.

In the labs, I often point out to visitors that we’ve based our work on the preamble to the Code of Ethics. I’ve included it below with the relevant bits highlighted:

Under all is the land. Upon its wise utilization and widely allocated ownership depend the survival and growth of free institutions and of our civilization. REALTORS® should recognize that the interests of the nation and its citizens require the highest and best use of the land and the widest distribution of land ownership. They require the creation of adequate housing, the building of functioning cities, the development of productive industries and farms, and the preservation of a healthful environment.

At CRT Labs, we use this to focus our mission. It’s not only key to your work, but also, to the potential that the Internet of Things, renewable energy, and community gardening have to impact your industry. In order to support the ‘building of functioning cities’ tenant, we’ve spoken to several smart city projects throughout the US. We believe that data from the smart city will go a long way to shaping how you do business in the future. It will change the way you interact with your customers and help you in supporting their buying choices. We are just at the very beginning of this and there’s still a way to go before this is mainstream, but what’s already happening is exciting.

What are smart cities?

Simply put, smart cities are cities that use existing data and connected sensors to:

  • Capture data and performance metrics to improve city services
  • Monitor city performance
  • Inform the general public

Cities great and small are employing smart city techniques all over the world. Singapore is one of the big leaders in this space, as is Barcelona. Here in the US, cities large and small have active programs. From Columbus, Ohio, to Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky as examples. For this series, I want to use what’s in my own back yard. Chicago has garnered a lot of attention of late for its Array of Things initiative and the use of its open data portal to engage the citizens.

Why do they matter?

Here’s why it matters to you: there are massive amounts of data that will be coming off these devices that will show how specific areas of a city are performing. As examples, you’ll be able to see things like:

  • Pedestrian and vehicle patterns and counts aggregated by time of day
  • Utilization patterns for parks and community buildings
  • Temperature variation at your work and at your home on a block by block basis
  • Air quality outside your door and any destination you need to travel to
  • Average sunlight exposure at any location
  • Standing water after a rainstorm

A number of those things above are key to how you’re home or property performs. Understanding microclimates will help buildings use less energy because they can adjust based on time of day or season. We can also understand busy residential and commercial areas are and use that as part of our marketing material or a widget on a website. When are the peak hours at the community pool or park? Data for a community could also inform when you hold open houses. How many people are in a neighborhood during a given day?

This is just the surface. I’m going to use this series to interview people here in Chicago who are involved in the smart cities initiatives and highlight where there are opportunities for real estate. If you have a story about smart city activity in your area, I encourage you to share it.

Related Articles from CRT Labs: