Coming Soon: A Pocket Guide to Air Purifying Plants

Over the past few months, CRT Labs, along with NAR’s Library and Information Technology staff, have been researching and developing a series of books about indoor air quality and plants you can grow in order to keep your air fresh and clean. The first in this Pocket Guide series is a book specifically aimed for commercial practitioners, and will educate REALTORS® about the best plants to advise their clients to buy for improving the indoor air quality of different office spaces. Further guides will dive into different residential air quality concerns.

NASA Plant Study

In the late 70s and early 80s, NASA began evaluating a variety of plants on their space stations to help clean the air onboard of not only carbon dioxide, but also from gases called volatile organic compounds. These gases, when contained and allowed to circulate in an indoor space, can lead the building’s occupants to contract a variety of illnesses. NASA identified 31 plants in their Clean Air Study as some of the best filters for these contaminants. We single out 10 of these plants due to their high ratings in the Clean Air Study as well as their availability at home and garden centers to focus on in our Pocket Guide. The book examines the best plants that work together to mitigate common indoor air quality issues in commercial spaces, teaches how to take care of these new plants, and includes rich color photographs of each plant discussed. Look for the book coming out in late spring or early summer this year, but until then, enjoy this excerpt from the book! These two paragraphs are from chapter two, titled “Thinking About the Air You Breathe.”

The average person spends around 90% of their time indoors, and the EPA estimates that indoor air quality can be two to five times more polluted than the air outdoors. This rise in indoor pollution is partially due to the fact that office design has shifted towards materials that release volatile organic compounds into the air. Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are found in almost all the materials in your buildings, especially in new construction – including the furniture, carpets, paints, cleaning products, and more. Buildings, which are more energy efficient than ever before, have tighter seals and are better constructed, which traps any pollution created indoors, or brought from the outdoors, in the building itself. These factors contribute to these higher levels of VOCs, as well as CO2, in the indoor air. Even while indoor air filtration systems are in use, VOCs can remain and continue to off-gas into the indoor environment.
VOCs, CO2, and other indoor environmental factors all contribute to sick building syndrome, which the National Institutes of Health define as “various nonspecific symptoms that occur in the occupants of a building… [which] increases sickness absenteeism and causes a decrease in productivity of the workers”. The symptoms of sick building syndrome include headache, dizziness, nausea, eye/nose/throat irritations, dry cough, dry/itching skin, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, sensitivity to odors, hoarseness of voice, allergies, cold/flu-like symptoms, asthma, and personality changes. Looking at this list, there’s an overlap in symptoms that are commonly associated with high levels of CO2 and VOCs in the air, meaning that sick building syndrome is likely brought on by these very gases.
The NASA Clean Air Study can be read in full at NASA’s website.