Things Thursday #020: What makes a city smart?, Microsoft entering the thermostat battle, and some great resources on smart homes for you

A hand holding our environmental quality sensor, which is called the Touchstone. It's about the size and shape of a bar of soap.

The Touchstone sensor from CRT Labs. This device will read temperature, humidity, light, CO2, VOCs, particulate matter and more.

  1. What are 10 key things that make a city smart? (via ReadWrite)
    This is a great roundup of what a city needs to be smart. From connectivity to sensing, ReadWrite put together a great roundup. If you’re interested in the real estate perspective on smart cities, we’ve got a series for you to check out called ‘The Building of Functioning Cities‘.
  2. And finally: Amazon Echo 2 incoming and more (via Wareable)
    Yes, this is a list of smart home/wearable items for you to peruse. They have some good intel on Amazon’s latest smart speaker as well as what Apple’s up to on the smart home front. Check it out.
  3. What to know about smart home technology: 10 smart home resources for REALTORS (via CRT Labs)
    Another roundup??? What’s going on with this list? 🙂 I would be remiss if I didn’t point you to our roundup of resources you can take advantage of to bolster your understanding of this emerging market. Why does it matter to you? Because it matters to your clients. Read on to find out more.
  4. Microsoft’s Cortana-powered thermostat is totally gorgeous (via CNET)
    This is definitely something to consider. A nice-looking thermostat from Microsoft and Johnson Controls. No pricing info yet, but keep an eye on this. It’s called the GLAS, it’s voice-enabled (with Cortana, Microsoft’s answer to Siri and Alexa) and it monitors indoor and outdoor air quality. If you want a voice-enabled thermostat now, check out the Ecobee4 with Alexa integration. If the $249 price point is keeping you away, you should look for rebates from your utility or insurance company.
  5. Touchstone: Environmental Quality Monitor for your home! (via CRT Labs)
    Finally, a look at what we’ve been up to. This device is not on the market yet, but take a look at our work. Really proud of our group here at NAR. Akram, one of our lab engineers, provides a pretty deep dive into what we’ve been up to with this device. I’m really proud of our team and their efforts to make this piece of hardware and the software behind it. They’ve been extremely supportive of one another and have collaborated better than I could have imagined. Kudos to them.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

Things Thursday #019: The Future is Now (or at least, a lot nearer than I thought)

A trio of articles on this week’s Things Thursday deal with the Internet of Things, new ways of accessing your personal data, and keeping that data secure.

Internet of Secure Things

  1. 4 ways that AI is enabling today’s IoT revolution (via ReadWrite).
    Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things aren’t buzzwords anymore, but companies are still struggling to grasp what AI and IoT can do for their industries. Good news is, most companies surveyed by Accenture are interested in implementing AI and IoT strategies over the next few years, with AI being at the heart of figuring out what to do with all that data that will be whizzing about into the cloud and IoT allowing companies to think creatively about the objects that will collect that data. I’m always dubious to hear companies thinking in these terms, but I’m glad to see that there is an interest in the overlap in physical objects and non-physical data.
  2. A biometric ring could replace your passwords, cards, and keys (via engadget).
    One of the first leaps for turning your non-physical information into a physical object is the Token ring, which uses biometrics (identifiers about individuals – retina scans and fingerprint IDs are other examples of biometrics in the wild – the Token uses a fingerprint ID) to allow you to get into a locked building, pay for the bus, and more. We’ve seen a fair share of trinkets purport to do this very thing, but it looks like Token has caught the eye of some major vendors, including partnerships with several large metropolitan areas to cover their public transit. The tech that interests me the most here is the sensors included to identify if the ring is on or off your finger.
  3. On not fearing a full basket of eggs (via CRTLabs).
    A bit of a cheat on this third item, but as this nebulous data becomes what identifies you, it’s important to keep that data safe. Joe’s post (here on the blog) on password managers is a good crash course in making strong passwords, and keeping your data safe, and should be required reading for everyone in this digital age. NAR has been working hard on getting out information to our membership to keep client data secure; a good first step in the process is to assess your own digital security and pass that information on to your clients.

Things Thursday #018: Detroit, Smart City! and how secure are your speakers and more

A picture of the Detroit skyline.

Detroit’s getting sensors provided by citizens. Read below about Sensors in a Shoebox.

  1. HomePod, Echo, Google Home: How secure are your speakers? (via C|NET)
    There are a lot of questions around security and smart devices like the speakers. In fact, the audience at my presentation at the South Bay Association of REALTORS this past Monday were very concerned around security of smart speakers. This nice quick piece on the security of your data from Apple, Google and Amazon’s voice automation speakers. It seems like Apple has the advantage based on their encryption best practices. Even though they cost around $349, the HomePods secure your data the same way that Apple’s Messages and Siri applications do. Check it out and see if your security questions are answered.
  2. Toyota is exploring heart rate monitoring cars to help prevent accidents (via Wareable)
    For me, these types of thoughts around smart technologies are very worthwhile. Nothing is imminent from Toyota, but they are exploring how to determine if a driver is incapacitated and what they can do to help them in case of emergency.
  3. Samsung challenges Google with Connect Home Wi-Fi mesh (via ReadWrite)
    Mesh networking is becoming a big market and it’s being driven by IoT. Samsung joins Google, eero and several other companies in trying to scratch this itch. Follow the link to see what they are up to.
  4. Detroit Imagines a Citizen-Led Smart City (via CityLab)
    This is the type of thing I love about smart city work. A community coming together to solve a problem. Detroit is a great innovation space due to its past economic downturn. The city is ripe for change and new ideas. Working with the University of Michigan, residents are deploying smart sensors. The project, called Sensors in a Shoebox, are providing a low-cost way for residents to understand their environment. Imagine if REALTORs could help deploy projects like this to improve quality of life. Pretty cool.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

Things Thursday #017: Security cameras run amok and how to help aging populations with IoT

A security camera with a blue overcast light on the entire image

Security cameras are ubiquitous. Are the intended audiences the only ones observing through these? Check out the post below from Cujo.

 

In this Things Thursday, we look at security for now and for the future, and how technology will impact the aging population.

  1. Watch a video of how a camera gets hacked (via Cujo)
    The link above comes from an internet firewall vendor, but it’s relevant to security and what’s happening with the internet of things. Because of the rush to scale security systems years ago, there are tons of systems that are susceptible to programs like Mirai. Watch the video to see how easy it can be to hack a camera. As the post says, only buy cameras from companies that are adhering to security practices. One example for you to look at is Canary.
  2. How will IoT change the lives of our aging population? (via ReadWrite)
    At CRT, we’ve been discussing this exact use case since we started the labs. What will the internet of things mean for accessibility for the aging and disabled populations? K4Communications is working on this problem, as they believe there is value in smart building tech beyond the flashy. We agree. We will be watching the work of this company.
  3. Thinking of using voice authentication? Think again! (via Embedded)
    Voice as a tool for authentication holds promise. There are challenges to it, however. Enter Lyrebird…a software platform intended to synthesize any voice and change intonation to make it sound more natural. The article looks at a biometric company called TrulySecure and the challenges around using voice for authentication. It’s definitely a good read.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

#016-Things Thursday: Cleaning the air without planting trees and more

An image of a product called CityTree, which has a park bench on each side and a 15ft wall of plants attached to both benches.

CityTree by GreenCity Solutions is an IoT device that monitors and cleans the air with plants.

In this week’s Things Thursday, we have a lot for the future, but also a lot focused on health. What if some devices

  1. Disney Research’s technology could transform IoT landscape (via Android Authority)
    Disney Research is one of the premier IoT/emerging technology labs in the world. They’ve got offices in Switzerland, Pittsburgh (in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University) and, of course, California. You might be surprised that Disney is doing scientific research, but when you think about the theme park business, it makes sense. Disneyworld and Disneyland are like miniature cities. So, from the lab comes another cool project from them. They’ve figured out how to reduce the power and improve the connectivity of IoT devices without an antenna. This is important for sensors that may have little to no external power options. They’ve also done research on powering devices without traditional power sources. Keep an eye on them.
  2. Microsoft Research’s ‘Emma Watch’ helped a Parkinson’s patient write again (via Wareable)
    Pretty amazing work from Microsoft Research. Parkinson’s wreaks havoc on your central nervous system and can make everyday activities a challenge. A researcher at Microsoft is building a device to reduce tremors for people living with Parkinson’s. In order to help people write or draw, the watch has tiny motors that vibrate on the patient’s arm, disrupting the feedback loop of the central nervous system. It’s pretty amazing. Click through and watch the video.
  3. Connected trees will be scrubbing the air in a city near you soon (via ReadWrite)
    Smart cities will not just be connected and gathering data, but they will help cities perform better. GreenCity Solutions are building these amazing benches that have plants and sensors embedded in them. They claim that their benches can filter the same amount of air as 275 planted trees. This means less watering needed, but the benefit of filtration from the plants is pretty great. Currently, CityTree is only in the European market and they have plans to expand to the US in late 2018. Even still, it’s a great example of how to green a space and provide some seating options. To find out more about why smart cities matter to REALTORS, check out my post on Building Functioning Cities.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook

#015-Things Thursday: Mickey Mousing around, John ‘Oh’ Deere, and IKEA gets smart

A farmer sits in his tractor with his back to us as the sun comes through the window over his shoulder.

John Deere smart tractors are being hacked by the farmers who own them…Why???

For this Things Thursday, some really interesting IoT news the past few weeks. Farmers are hacking their tractors and IKEA enters the fray in the smart home market.

  1. American farmers are hacking their tractors with Ukrainian firmware (via Motherboard)
    What’s causing farmers to hack their smart tractors? Manufacturers are locking the tractors down with specialized software and farmers are fighting back. If you thought Apple’s walled garden was bad, read on to see what’s happening to the modern farmer. Great read and amazing ingenuity on the parts of the farmers.
  2. How I let Disney track my every move (via Gizmodo)
    Have you been to a Disney park lately? They are doing some amazing things with proximity sensing. You can pay, check in to a hotel and rides and make reservations all with the Magic Band. Disney can see how people move about the park with anonymized data and improve services. This type of trade off of our personal data is similar to what we do with services like Facebook. The author hacked his Magic Band to see what smart devices he could control with it.Turns out, he could control a lot. Check it out.
  3. IKEA launches its own low-cost smart lighting range (via Wareable)
    Some pretty interesting work from IKEA to bring smart home prices down. From motion-sensing lights to lighted doors for your IKEA furniture, they’ve got some really interesting and diverse items. You can dim the lights with an unattached knob device which uses an accelerometer. It will be interesting to see how much they start to incorporate into their furniture.

That’s all for Things Thursday this week. Have questions? Want us to cover something? Let us know. You can follow us on Twitter @crtlabs or Facebook.